Foreign Language

First-Year Language

One course required of all Freshmen (unless placed into higher level) and all Juniors; Honors Credit for Foreign Language courses may be earned upon satisfactory completion of extra requirements.

French I

A beginning course in which the speaking, listening, writing and reading skills are introduced and practiced, with the goal of attaining level-one proficiency in a second language as defined by the New York State Department of Education. Students are familiarized with basic grammatical structure, vocabulary, and verbs in the present, immediate future, and recent past tenses. Discussion of the French-speaking world and major cultural differences between France and America, folkloric songs and varied performances in French during assemblies provide cultural enrichment.

Spanish I

This class provides the basic foundation (level-one proficiency in a second language as defined by the New York State Department of Education) to develop Spanish language skills. Vocabulary, basic grammar, writing, reading, listening and speaking skills are learned and practiced. The class also provides an introduction to Spanish and Hispanic cultures.

Latin I

This course covers basic Latin grammar and syntax: declension, all indicative forms of the verb, and participial constructions (level-one proficiency in a second language as defined by the New York State Department of Education). Students are introduced almost immediately to the reading of extended passages of Latin prose, and by the end of the course read brief, edited passages of standard authors. Students also receive some basic instruction in history, mythology, archaeology, and art history.

Second-Year Language

One course required of all Sophomores (unless placed into higher level) and all Seniors; Honors Credit for Foreign Language courses may be earned upon satisfactory completion of extra requirements.

French II

This is an intermediate course with greater emphasis on oral communication. After a review of material covered in French I, more advanced grammatical structures (level-two proficiency in a second language as defined by the New York State Department of Education) are presented and practiced. The students learn past tenses and read longer texts and write longer compositions. They continue to explore the French-speaking world through videos and music.

Spanish II

This class continues the study of Spanish language begun in Spanish I to level-two proficiency in a second language as defined by the New York State Department of Education. Oral communication, writing and reading skills are further developed. Intermediate-level grammatical structures are learned and practiced.

Latin II

This course continues instruction in Latin syntax (indirect discourse and subjunctive constructions) up to level-two proficiency in a second language as defined by the New York State Department of Education. Historical and cultural topics continue to be studied, and in more detail. Upon completion of the course (roughly equivalent to two semesters of intensive, college-level Latin instruction), students are able, with the aid of a dictionary, to read any standard prose author.

Third-Year Language

One course required of all Juniors (unless placed into higher level); Honors Credit for Foreign Language courses may be earned upon satisfactory completion of extra requirements.

French III

This class develops the content introduced in French II to level-three proficiency in a second language as defined by the New York State Department of Education. Conversational fluency is emphasized. Students learn and practice more complex grammatical structures with greater emphasis on oral and aural skills, composition and reading comprehension. Students watch news and entertainment programs and gain a deeper understanding of culture through French film, poetry and art. Completion of this course fulfills the requirements for the New York State Regents’ Diploma with Advanced Designation.

Spanish III

This class develops the content introduced in Spanish II. Conversational fluency is emphasized. Students learn and practice more complex grammatical structures with greater emphasis on composition and reading comprehension. Completion of this course fulfills the requirements for the New York State Regents’ Diploma with Advanced Designation.

Latin III: Survey of Latin Prose and Poetry

This course samples a broad range of Latin literature. The first semester concentrates on prose, the second on poetry. Considerable attention is paid to the historical and literary context of the texts read, to conventions of various genres, and rhetorical techniques. Completion of this course fulfills the requirements for the New York State Regents’ Diploma with Advanced Designation. Students who successfully complete this course are also eligible to receive 6 college credits through the St. John’s University Bridge Program.

Electives

Spanish IV
Elective; Departmental permission required

This class is designed for the appreciation of the culture of the Spanish-speaking peoples and to increase proficiency in the Spanish language. Students will concentrate on the study of the language through civilization, literature, films and current events of Spain and Latin America. Students who successfully complete this course are eligible to receive 6 college credits through the St. John’s University Bridge Program.

AP French
Elective; Departmental permission required

A very advanced course for students (post third year instruction) who wish to develop their proficiency in the French language and understanding of contemporary Francophone societies and cultures. Through a thematic curriculum, students are exposed to things such as newspaper articles, literary excerpts, film, websites and podcasts. Students will gain the skills necessary to allow for interaction with one another in conversation, debate issues and present for the class in fluent French.

AP Latin
Elective; Departmental permission required

This course offers in-depth study of the great national epic of the Romans, Virgil’s Aeneid, and Caesar’s Commentaries on the Gallic War, preparing students for the College Board’s Advanced Placement examination in Latin. Careful attention is devoted to cultural and historical context of these works. Above all, students are encouraged to appreciate these texts as enjoyable and accessible work of literature.

Mythology
Elective

This course surveys the mythology of ancient Greece and Rome. Through readings and visual presentations, mythological and legendary stories are examined in the context of the art and literature of antiquity later periods. Considerable attention is also devoted to the historical context in which these stories emerged, and the relationship between mythology and religion.